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    • DSS releases V2 Hellcat carbon fiber and aluminum driveshafts good for 8600 lbs of torque

      Early on Hellcats on the dragtrip had an issue breaking driveshafts with hard launches on a prepped surface. What do you expect with 4500+ pounds being launched by a 6.2 liter twin screw supercharged V8 and 650 lb-ft of torque?


      Well, that is where DSS (Driveshaft Shop) comes in with their revised V2 version driveshafts.

      Here is what changed:

      Quote Originally Posted by DSS
      New from the Devils at DSS, We have updated our Carbon fiber and Aluminum driveshafts to this V2 version. What’s different? We wanted to make our current offerings even better. We have been working on a new 113mm CV joint that we have in both “fixed” and ”plunging” styles and all the internals are precision ground for smooth movement and fit. Now we offer a driveshaft with CV on both ends as opposed to a U-joint. Available in both 4” aluminum and a new wind of 3.25 carbon that was tested to 8600lbs of torque. And like all DSS shafts its high speed balanced.
      If you do not want your Hellcat breaking driveshafts, this is your solution.






      This article was originally published in forum thread: DSS releases V2 Hellcat carbon fiber and aluminum driveshafts good for 8600 lbs of torque started by Sticky View original post
      Comments 2 Comments
      1. Bowser330's Avatar
        Bowser330 -
        Torque multiplication from the transmission is the only multiplier to include, you shouldn't have to add the final drive as its after the driveshaft, that is for calculating stresses for the half shafts.

        8 speed auto has a 4.71 first gear ratio, meaning that 8,600lbs of torque means the carbon driveshaft can withstand 1,826ftlbs of torque.....that's a really nice safety margin
      1. Sticky's Avatar
        Sticky -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Bowser330 Click here to enlarge
        Torque multiplication from the transmission is the only multiplier to include, you shouldn't have to add the final drive as its after the driveshaft, that is for calculating stresses for the half shafts.

        8 speed auto has a 4.71 first gear ratio, meaning that 8,600lbs of torque means the carbon driveshaft can withstand 1,826ftlbs of torque.....that's a really nice safety margin
        You're calculating axle torque and that's quite correct. Most people ignore gearing or how torque changes per gear.